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Speakers in the Schools

Browse Speakers in the Schools Presentations

Browse by Speakers in alphabetical order | Browse by subject | Browse by Speakers in the Schools Presentations (current)

For speaker contact information, please go to the Browse by Speakers page and expand under each Speaker Bio.

Speakers in the Schools (Alphabetical by Presentation Title)

Aesop’s Fables for Children: Adopted by Preshenda

The first beloved printed version of Aesop’s Fables in English was published on March 26, 1484. Fables belong essentially to the oral tradition and survived by being remembered and then retold.  Aesop’s Fables or the Aesopica is a collection of fables credited to Aesop, a slave and storyteller believedto have lived in ancient Greece 620 and 560 BCE. Storytelling with Preshenda will bring these timeless and fun stories to life, with her skillful use of mime, music, movement and theater.  Her performances are for students K-12 grades, and the stories will be written and told to interest proper ages.  Children, youth, teenagers, and adults will treasure these timeless stories by Aesop.

  • Speaker – Gladys Preshenda Jackson
  • Presentation Category - Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – African American
African American Pioneers of Arizona

Featuring compelling documentaries based on interviews, this presentation shares stories about prominent African Americans who contributed to the life and culture of Arizona.  Such luminaries include the late Dr. Eugene Grigsby, Betty Fairfax, Judge Jean Williams, Rev. Warren Stewart, Councilman Calvin Goode, and Carol Coles Henry.  Each individual’s life is contextualized using prominent events that have taken place in Arizona and the impact his/her work had on the social, cultural and political lives of the state is discussed.

  • Speaker – Akua Duku Anokye
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
Arizona Springs: 10,000 Points of Life

Description – Springs are ecosystems that occur where groundwater reaches the Earth’s surface. Springs are generally small but are significant hotspots of biological and cultural diversity. In this talk, we will explore the great diversity of life forms that occupy Arizona springs, including rare plants, strange insects, and the remarkable group of Arizona fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals that dwell at springs. Living and preserved specimens will help illustrate the life of Arizona’s springs. This presentation will provide information about the natural history of, and will aid in understanding and improved management of springs.

  • Speaker - Lawrence Stevens
  • Presentation Category – Science, Technology & Culture (as it relates to the humanities)
Arizona’s Territorial Historian, Poet, and Activist Sharlot Hall

Sharlot Mabridth Hall was an unusual woman for her time: a largely self-educated but highly literate child of the frontier. Born October 27, 1870, she traveled with her family from Kansas to the Arizona Territory in 1882. Her impressions of this journey remained with her all of her life. She loved ideas and the written arts and expressed her fascination with Arizona frontier life through prose and poetry. She was the Arizona Territories first female historian. Her diligent efforts inspired others to contribute to the preservation of early Arizona history. After her death on April 9, 1943 a historical society continued her efforts to build the complex that bears her name.

  • Speaker – Jody Drake
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
Arizona’s Unsolved Mysteries

We are intrigued by unsolved mysteries, because it would seem almost impossible for anyone to totally vanish from the face of the earth at any time. This is especially true in our day and age when a host of computer data tracks everyone; yet bodies do disappear with astonishing frequency. In some cases it may be presumed that people wished to disappear, but then why? Even more unsettling is the realization that certain people may have gotten away with the perfect crime. Whether the unsolved mystery is more than a hundred years old or recent does not seem to make much difference. Perhaps the most enduring quality of an unsolved mystery is that it continues to haunt us.

  • Speaker – Jane Eppinga
  • Presentation Category - History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
Arizona’s Wacky Critters & Human Habits (Grade 2 and younger)

With the help of some of her puppet friends, award-winning author Lynda Exley discusses the wild and wacky ways Arizona critters survive and compares it to human habitats – past and present. With information from Arizona Way Out West & Wacky, she also takes kids on a journey through the past, where they compare how children played and lived in the past to what they do today. There will also be hands-on games, prizes and giveaways. Arizona Education Standards Met: Social Studies, Strand 4, Concepts 2, 4, 5.

  • Speaker – Lynda Exley
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
Aw-Thum Bow & Arrow “Don’t Get the String Wet.”

Growing up playing and shooting an Aw-Thum bow (circa 1926) was a favorite pastime for Royce Manuel who was told by his father “make your own arrows and don’t get the string wet.” The bow string made from horse intestines were forever changed when the sprinkles of rain came. Manuel’s grandfather shared stories while demonstrating the most effective way of holding an arrow to meet its mark. With many men sharing their words of wisdom; Royce Manuel followed their teachings while eventually developing his own method that remained true to his father’s bow.

  • Speaker – Royce & Debbie Manuel
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Native American
Aztecs in Arizona, then and… now?! Reflections of A Modern-day Aztec Warrior

Did you know that Aztec history in Arizona goes back to before the time of the Hohokam? It’s evidence is all around you if you know what to look for (even in Old Town Scottsdale!) Alberto Olivas gives a brief history of the Mexica (Aztec) people in Arizona and tells the story of discovering his own Mexica heritage, his accidental introduction to the Aztec community in Arizona, and engages participants in a fun and thought-provoking discussion about what it means to be a “cultural warrior”.

  • Speaker – Alberto Olivas
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
Beautiful Games: American Indian Sport and Art

Similar to what a person can find in art, sport and games also come to us with good and bad qualities. When bad there is evidence of cheating, chauvinism, narcissism, civil unrest, and stereotypes. And when good we gain aspects of trust, cooperation, fairness, focus, patience, and control. The values gained in the practice of sports are instructive for life as they a place an emphasis on respect, fraternity and discipline, all three of which are synonymous with teaching and learning.  This presentation uses sport and art to delve into topics of innovation, creativity, and community.

  • Speaker – Marcus Monenerkit
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – General
Bosnia: Crossroads of Cultures

In Bosnia people joke that: “We have more history than we can stand.” The fact that Bosnia’s cultural and religious diversity has often led to conflict in the 20th century has led many people to consider this diversity a curse. However, it has also proven to be a source of great richness and beauty. This presentation will look at Bosnia as a crossroads of cultures: a place where the Catholic West, Orthodox East, and Muslim Middle East – with significant Jewish contributions – come together to create a complex and vibrant, if sometimes troubled, society.

  • Speaker – Lisa Adeli
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – World
Celebrating Black History

This is an interactive workshop that explores influential and little known African American contributions and the road they paved to make it possible for African American leaders we have today such as Oprah Winfrey, Michael Jordan, and Maya Angelou.

  • Speaker – Tamika Lamb-Sanders
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – African American
The Culture and Traditions of Iran, Outlier of the Middle East

Iran is (rightly) considered part of the “Middle East,” yet few Americans realize how different it is from the other Middle Eastern countries around it. This presentation gives an overview of the language, culture, religions, and traditions of Iran, highlighting their similarities, distinctive qualities, and cultural impact within the region.

  • Speaker – Lisa Adeli
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – General
Deliverance in the Desert: the San Patricios in the Mexican-American War

One of the more unique and little known episodes of the Mexican-American War is the desertion of an immigrant battalion from the US Army.  The San Patricios, comprised primarily of Irish-Catholic immigrants, ended up distinguishing themselves as a special battalion of the Mexican Army in a handful of engagements during the war.  While the result was devastating for both the San Patricios as well as the Mexican Army, the account is missing from most history books and classes.  Find out why in this presentation.

  • Speaker – Ryan Davis
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – United States
Dramatic Science: Playing with Atoms in the Solar System

Drama was a key tool in communicating and understanding some of the more earth shattering discoveries and ideas in the realm of science.  Some scientists have used the genre of drama to communicate their theories and observations in order to avoid persecution and imprisonment.  Such was the case with Galileo.  Yet, he was not the only scientists to employ the humanities as a means of communicating his ideas which changed our understanding of the world we live.  Who else did this?  What other sciences have melded with drama to communicate?  This presentation will provide some of the answers.

  • Speaker – Ryan Davis
  • Presentation Category – Science, Technology & Culture (as it relates to the humanities)
Eastern Europe’s Dramatic Democratic Revolution:  Throwing off the Shackles of Communism

From Bosnia to Bulgaria, Macedonia to Moldova, and Slovakia to Slovenia, Eastern Europe has thrown off the shackles of Communism and experienced a dramatic transformation toward Democracy during the past 20 years.  After a half-century of Soviet domination, much of the region has embraced Western ideals while still maintaining a unique and highly diverse culture. What brought about these stirring changes?  How has the democratization changed the daily lives of Eastern Europeans?  What has been America’s role in the region?  What are the challenges still facing this vitally important geopolitical area?  And finally, what about the recent Russian incursion into Ukraine?

  • Speaker – Dan Fellner
  • Presentation Category - Geography and Environment
An Ethic of Service

This presentation aims to engage students in dialogue around civic service. Storyteller Caleb Winebrenner offers personal examples from his time serving in AmeriCorps, as well as excepts of famous speeches such as Washington’s Farewell Address, Kennedy’s 1960 speech at the University of Michigan (where he called for the creation of the Peace Corps), or Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream.” Students will use stories to connect these speeches to their own lives, as well as learn more about service programs after high school.

  • Speaker – Caleb Winebrenner
  • Presentation Category - Law and Civic Engagement
The Explorations and Discoveries of George Bird Grinnell, The Father of Glacier National Park

The great West that George Bird Grinnell first encountered in 1870 as a 21-year old man was shortly to disappear before his eyes. Nobody was quicker to sense the desecration or was more eloquent in crusading against the poachers, the hidehunters, and the disengaged U.S. Congress than George Bird Grinnell, the “Father of American Conservation.” Grinnell founded the first Audubon Society, cofounded the Boone and Crockett Club with Teddy Roosevelt, and led the effort to establish Glacier National Park. Audiences will travel back in time to the 19th century, listening to Grinnell’s own words as taken from his field journals, memoirs, personal correspondence, and newspaper editorials.

  • Speaker – Hugh Grinnell
  • Presentation Category - History & Heritage – United States
Father Kino

Father Kino is one of two Arizonans recognized in the U. S. Capitol Hall of Heroes.  The Padre was a mathematician, astronomer, geographer, map maker, explorer, rancher, and friend to the Indians of the Pimería Alta.  Journeying on horseback or foot, multiple explorations of the Pimería Alta were made by the padre, resulting in the first detailed map of the area.  He proved Baja California was not an island.  He traveled trails mostly unknown to outsiders through inhabited territory of unknown tribes. This PowerPoint presentation will concentrate on Father Kino’s expeditions and discoveries into the Pimería Alta, his maps, and the discovery of his remains in Magdalena de Kino in 1966.

  • Speaker – Barbara Jaquay
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
The Harlem Renaissance: Literary Movement

The Harlem Renaissance was not only a movement but an enriching and defining period in history that celebrated African Americans.  The Harlem Renaissance was the name given to the cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, and was considered to be a rebirth of African American arts. The Harlem Renaissance was a literary, artistic, and intellectual movement that ignited a new black cultural identity spanning the 1920s to the mid-1930s, and grew out of the changes that had taken place in the black community since the abolition of slavery, as the expansion of communities in the North.  Storytelling will include music, poetry, and interactive engagement with students.

  • Speaker – Gladys Preshenda Jackson
  • Presentation Category - Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – African American
Himdak doo IIna:  A Way of Life. How Societies Shape Culture.

For tribal groups in Arizona, understanding the connections between physical, social, mental and spiritual identity of the people prior to birth through 102 years old is a way of life. Tribes in Arizona often illustrate their balance between patriarch and matriarch societies through symbolism. Illustrating with the Man in the maze and the Navajo basket designs, Royce Manuel, Auk-Mierl Aw-Thum and Debbie Nez-Manuel, Diné unfold the general understanding of two common designs.

  • Speaker – Royce & Debbie Manuel
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Native American
How the West Was Fun: WOWWing with AZ History (Grades 3 and up)

Award-winning author Lynda Exley, coauthor of Arizona Way Out West & Wacky, discusses Arizona’s zaniest legends, humorous history and fun factoids. Discover why sleeping in wet sheets was a good thing, why some Arizonans ate fruit others spit out, why kissing cornhusks or apples goodnight wasn’t unusual, which city got its name by mistake and more! Inadvertently, audiences learn how past cultures obtained and preserved food, the historical significance of city names, how modern conveniences changed the landscape, how copper mining put AZ cities on the map, and more. There will be hands-on games, prizes and giveaways. Education Standards Met: Social Studies, Strand 4, Concepts 2, 4, 5.

  • Speaker – Lynda Exley
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
In Her Shoes: Celebrating Women’s History

During this workshop students will have the opportunity to learn about the historical achievements of popular U.S American women, in addition to contributions made by African America, Latino, and Native American women. Additionally, students will learn about the social and political background surrounding each woman presented in order to understand why their achievements and contributions were considered significant. The timeline will cover events such as the Seneca Falls Conference, the Women’s Suffrage Movement, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, and women in key leadership positions today. Teachers will be given worksheets and projects that students can do once the presentation ends.

  • Speaker – Tamika Lamb-Sanders
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Women’s Studies
KIAHA: Women’s Burden Basket, She Was Fed the People.

With the Agave woven, lace coiled backpack, the Aw-AwThum created a unique method of transporting trade goods to market. Prior to attaining a horse drawn wagon, the Aw-AwThum walked everywhere and the women carried up on their back a woven basket made of agave cordage. The women could gather wood for cooking and when possible would make pottery to sell or trade to merchants in neighboring towns. With their kiaha weighing anywhere from 60 lbs. to 100 lbs., the women walked with their baskets, hoping to trade their fine pottery.

  • Speaker – Royce & Debbie Manuel
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Native American
Little Sur Shot – Annie Oakley and the Clossing of the American West

Annie Oakley is perhaps the best recognized, but little know personalities that came out of the American West.  Her life story is one which is enmeshed deeply into the fabric of the American character.  However it was not a cookie cutter life.  Oakley defied social norms and cultural mores and expectations of her time while also being an exemplar of American Victorian womanhood.  Oakley’s life provides an insight to a time of transition and upheaval in the nation that is both uniquely American and individual at the same time.

  • Speaker – Ryan Davis
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – General
Legends of Love: Exploring Feminine Archetypes in Chicano/Latino History

A mother’s love, her search for her children, and her desire to serve her family through trials, persecution and death, permeate Chicano/Latino history and culture. Malinalli Tenepal, (Creeping Vine) or Malinche, became the mistress of Hernán Cortés, and later served to remind us that when crushed through oppression, the spirit will rise. Shunned as the infamous “bogey woman” of the Latino world, and known to fly as a ghost at night searching for the children she drowned, La Llorona has a difficult lesson to teach us: the search for wholeness is our birthright. Finally, the Virgen de Guadalupe, has no equal in beauty, and grace,  and her miraculous story is over 500 years old!

  • Speaker – Stella Pope Duarte     
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Chicano & Mexican American
Migration, Mestizaje and the New Millennium

What is Aztlán? Where is the Place of Whiteness, Siapu, as described by ancient native tribes? This question is at the root of the first migration of the ancient Mexicas (Aztec) to what would one day become Mexico City. Led by their war god, they settled in the Valley of Mexico, in 1325, and after 300 years, were conquered by the blue-eyed, bearded, Hernán Cortés, who they mistook for their god of peace Quetzalcoatl. Thus, through the mixture of European and Indigenous blood, came the mestizos, modern-day Mexicans and Chicanos, a people who would over hundreds of years migrate north and become one of America’s most powerful, and enduring cultures. Theirs is an unforgettable story.

  • Speaker – Stella Pope Duarte     
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – Chicano & Mexican American
Music’s Healing Power

We have used music to aid healing but only recently have we understood how it works. Music has always been intricately involved in cultures, from lullabies to dirges, work songs to war songs, entertainment to music’s profound role in spiritual expression. There is no culture without it. Thought to have the power to heal the “soul,” it also relaxes and energizes us, inspire us to dance, aids our rites of passage. We now know it can significantly lessen pain, soothe anxiety and increase well-being for the injured and ill. Music is used to unlock secrets of the brain, healing processes and learning. What potential benefits can this mysterious phenomenon have for you?

  • Speaker – Janice Jarrett
  • Presentation Category – Science, Technology & Culture (as it relates to the humanities)
On the Arizona Frontier Ranch Medicine

*New Presentation*

Once your family arrived in the west often there was not a doctor within miles. The medical care of the family landed in the hands of the family. Luckily, it was soon learned that the plants held many secrets for someone who was ill. Chew a little willow bark for a headache, pine needles are rich in vitamin C, a spider web will close up a cut, and so much more. For this presentation a frontier medical bag is used to take and in depth look at illness and how it was treated in late 1800s Arizona.

  • Speaker – Jody Drake
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
“On the Road Again”: Don’t Forget the Small Towns!

As the mode of transportation changed from wagons to trains to the affordable automobile and roads were built across the country, families began a process of “leisure travel” that the automobile could provide. The “new tourist” was no longer restricted by a train’s timetable or its set route. The wide open spaces and the off-the-beaten path were theirs to explore. As roads turned into superhighways, small town America got left behind. Working with local artistic talent and others, communities worked to attract these tourists to their towns and/or make it inviting to potential settlers. This presentation will chronologically show communities using roadside architecture, murals, amusement parks, local historic reenactments to week long festivals of folk heroes/tall tale characters, to the longest garage sale to attract tourist.

  • Speaker – Barbara Jaquay
  • Presentation Category – Art, Architecture, and Music
Origins of Civil Rights

The phrase “civil rights” commonly appears in much public discussion. But what are “civil rights”? Where did they come from? Why do we have them? Civil rights in U. S. law have revolved around what, if any, personal characteristics should control the legal relation of an individual to others and to the community at large, particularly in regard to law’s recognition of what a person could and could not do, should and should not do, and the basis on which capacity and constraint rest. This presentation seeks to develop a picture of the legal principles and practices of civil rights as federal law during its formative period.

  • Speaker – Thomas J. Davis
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – United States
A Pictorial History of Arizona from Prehistory to the Present

If a picture is worth a thousand words, this program could fill a seven-volume history of Arizona. From the geological wonders of the Grand Canyon and the Petrified Forest to cutting-edge biotech industries and Native American art galleries, this whirlwind pictorial history tour of Arizona from prehistory to the present shows it all. In addition to beautiful landscape photography and historic site images, this engaging program addresses Arizona‘s cultural diversity, mining, and the history of water use.

  • Speaker – Jim Turner
  • Presentation Category - History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
Race and Law in U.S. History

Race has been much contested in U.S. history. Yet it has never been a single thing. Nor has it always been the same thing. Race has been part of a changing national identity. More personally, race has been part of variable individual identity. Who was white, who was Indian, who was black, for example, has not always had the same answer in U.S. history. Yet race has been a persistent element of identity. Every generation of Americans has wrestled with race as a defining issue. It has been long argued over in law. It has been crucial in national and local politics and has presented problems aplenty for government, public policy, and popular practice.

  • Speaker – Thomas J. Davis
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – United States
Read an Ancient Poem—in Just One Hour

For most people, poetry is daunting, the effort far outweighing the reward. In this presentation, based on a program that has seen success in Great Britain, we take a step back—far, far back—to the poetry of the ancient Greeks and Romans. You don’t need to know a word of the ancient languages to follow along; you’ll find that, by tackling a single, short poem in an unknown language, and following all its moves—from characteristics as simple as sound and grammar all the way to the most complex—you can understand how poetry works. The poetry we’ll look at is from the tradition that informs Western literature to this day: you’ll leave the lecture with a new key to the world of literature!

  • Speaker – Michael Tueller
  • Presentation Category – Language and Literature
Reading, Writing, and Fun with Polly and the Peaputts 

Welcome to Peaputt Place! Come meet Polly, her family, and friends. See how Polly and the Peaputts live, love, learn, and smile. In this three part book series, see how Polly and her friends work on acceptance, forgiveness, cooperation, inclusion, and many more constructive interactions. Participants will have opportunities to explore language understanding through five development areas—listening/observing, speaking, reading, writing, and storytelling—maybe even some acting out. The Peaputt books are also aligned with the English Language Arts Standards (ELAS) of the national Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initiative.

  • Speaker – Rodo Sofranac
  • Presentation Category – Language and Literature
The Secret Ingredient to the Civil Rights Movement

Here we explore the growth of black federal employment in contrast to a more openly hostile and discriminatory private sector after WWII. Many urban blacks escaped both social and economic oppression in the South and found more security in federal employment, allowing for the personal stability necessary to risk participating in the growing Civil Rights Movement. Many black public sector employees quietly waged battles for dignity and respect within labor circles and within society at large, eventually forcing the federal government to “pay it forward” with innovative workplace protections (e.g., Title VII of CRA) that ultimately benefited all American citizens. Discover these unsung heroes!

  • Speaker – Frederick Gooding, Jr.
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – African American
Southern Arizona Cemeteries

Throughout the ages we humans have had a need to mark the time and place where people make the final stop on their journey from this world to the next. Sometimes it is a simple cross on rock covered earth while others are elaborate tombstones which tell something of the lives of their residents. There is probably nothing so poignant as a tiny tombstone marking the death of a child whose duration on earth is measured from a few minutes to a few years. Don’t miss the chance to learn more about Arizona cemeteries.

  • Speaker – Jane Eppinga
  • Presentation Category - History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
“Tell It Like It is”: The Modern American Storytelling Movement

More Americans are telling stories to each other in public than at any time in recent history. All over the nation, including in Arizona, people are gathering to tell their own stories and the stories of their families and friends. Why has face-to-face storytelling become so popular? The key lies in the needs of a large, multicultural populace to meet and interact through common experiences. In addition, our focus on our small-screened, solitary devices creates a need to be with other people. In this presentation, Liz Warren will discuss the traditional roots of the modern storytelling movement, tell stories, and engage the listeners in their own storytelling, too.

  • Speaker – Liz Warren
  • Presentation Category – Language and Literature
Stories of Cooperation

This presentation will use traditional folklore stories and stories from American history to illustrate the importance of cooperation in order to bring about civic discourse and community engagement. Connecting the stories to their own lives, students will explore their choices in different situations, how their participation is beneficial, and the beliefs and actions that make civic engagement possible.

  • Speaker – Caleb Winebrenner
  • Presentation Category - Humanities in Contemporary Issues
Tombstone, Arizona: The Town Too Tough to die

Tombstone, which had a reputation, as one of the West’s wildest mining towns, owes its beginning to Ed Schieffelin, who prospected the nearby hills. From nearby Fort Huachuca, Schieffelin told a soldier that the mountains’ rich colors looked very promising for mineral wealth. The soldier said “All you’ll find in those hills is your tombstone”. In February 1878 Schieffelin found a vein of rich silver ore and registered two claims as the Tombstone and the Graveyard. During this presentation Jane tells the history of Tombstone through vintage photographs and shows that the town is much more than its famous gunfight.

  • Speaker – Jane Eppinga
  • Presentation Category - History & Heritage – Arizona and the Southwest
The U.S. Constitution: What It Says and How It Works

Most Americans think they know what the Constitution says but few have actually examined it. Here is an opportunity to review the concepts and composition of the document that functions as the legal foundation and framework of the nation. The Constitution provides principles for federal relations with the nation’s constituent states, citizens, and inhabitants. It has deployed a constitutional system called federalism. Its hallmarks have featured dual sovereignty, delegated and reserved powers, and guarantees of personal civil liberties and rights.

  • Speaker – Thomas J. Davis
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – United States
What Can One Person Do? How?

Margaret Mead said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.” Who were these citizens then? In this presentation, students will learn about different groups of citizens who have engaged to make a difference. The focus of the presentation will be on citizens brainstorming ideas for meaningful service projects for their community, and reflect on how their own skills, talents, and interests can bring that project into fruition.

  • Speaker – Caleb Winebrenner
  • Presentation Category - Humanities in Contemporary Issues
What has antiquity done for me?

You’ve heard that we should learn to “think outside the box.” Well, where exactly are the edges of that box? Who made it? And why? In this presentation, we’ll go back to the world of the ancient Greeks and Romans, whose writings still form the basis for the stories we tell about ourselves. Ancient poetry, we’ll see, contains roots of today’s movies, songs—and even science! Choices made by people with names like “Aristotle” and “Hipparchus”—choices that could have been made differently—established the boundaries for much of our thinking to this day. Once we learn what these ancients did, we’ll be able both to use that “box” as a sturdy foundation and to step firmly outside it and innovate!

  • Speaker – Michael Tueller
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – World
What Music Tells Us About the Brain

Many neuroscientists study music to elucidate mysteries of the brain. Why is music such a rich resource?  Not only can scientists physically track the process of learning music as different areas of the brain light up, they can trace music’s powerful effect on our emotions, muscles and memory.  The benefits of music span well beyond entertainment. and many believe music will be the healing art of the future.  Accumulating data about our “brain on music” unmistakably supports how important, positive and valuable music is our well-being, and self expression, as well as its role in the human evolutionary process.

  • Speaker – Janice Jarrett
  • Presentation Category – Art, Architecture, and Music
Words Hurt-Anti-Bullying Workshop

*New Presentation*

Hateful words are one of the main reasons why bullying is a growing phenomenon that causes over 160,000 students to miss school every day. A recent U.S. study shows that 17 percent of students reported having been bullied “sometimes” or often. Through the use of activities and group discussions, this workshop will help students understand the impact of bullying and how to combat bullying at home or in school

  • Speaker – Tamika Lamb-Sanders
  • Presentation Category – Humanities in Contemporary Issues
World War I in the Middle East: Roots of Contemporary Conflict

Although World War I occurred a century ago, its effects are still evident in the Middle East today. The war left memories of suffering and brought about new political realities. The Ottoman Empire ended, and new states were created, yet the peace settlements left many Middle Eastern people dissatisfied. The post-war treaties left millions of Kurds without a country, divided Arab lands into various British and French mandates, and pitted Turks against Greeks, Turks against Armenians, Palestinians against Jews. This presentation looks at the legacy of World War I in the Middle East and the Great War’s impact on recent conflicts in Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, and Israel/Palestine.

  • Speaker – Lisa Adeli
  • Presentation Category – History & Heritage – World
You Mean, There’s RACE in My Movie?!

This unique workshop provides a framework that allows everyone to engage in a constructive dialogue without sugarcoating the harsh realities of the disparities seen throughout Hollywood. First, attendees will quickly learn the six standard patterns for minority characters in mainstream movies. With the analytical framework serving as the foundation for the discussion, attendees will then be asked to analyze movie clips using the newly acquired rubric, and conduct small group exercises with timely industry research and eye-popping statistics about mainstream movies. After participating in this dynamically interactive experience, audiences will never see movies the same way again

  • Speaker – Frederick Gooding, Jr.
  • Presentation Category – Culture, Gender, and Identity Studies – General